You’re never alone with MobileHelp!

MobileHelp is more than a medical alert system.  It’s a Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) that enables subscribers to summon help at home and away from home. Central Station is prepared to request police, medical, or fire dispatch at any time.

 

Here are a few examples from Q1:

 

01/01/20   INTRUDER IN HOUSE

01/10/20   SOMEONE GOT HIT BY A CAR IN FRONT OF HOUSE

01/11/20   SMALL KITCHEN FIRE

01/22/20   GOT HIT BY A CAR AWAY FROM HOME

01/22/20   KITCHEN IS ON FIRE

01/27/20   FIRE AT THE LOCATION

02/03/20   GOT HIT WHILE CROSSING THE STREET

02/06/20   SIDE OF THE HIGHWAY AND HER VEHICLE WAS ON FIRE

02/07/20   STRUCTURE FIRE

02/17/20   INTRUDER IN HOUSE

02/17/20   HOUSE IS BURNING AND ON FIRE

03/19/20   INTRUDER IN HER HOME

MobileHelp makes it fast and easy to summon help, and is essential for virtually anyone.

 

If communication is not established, a medical dispatch will be requested. However, if an operator is advised of another type of emergency, the appropriate agency such as police, medical, or fire will be notified.


Away From Home

On 02/15/2020 at 10:53 AM, an operator established communication via Mobile Device and a woman responded, “We need 9-1-1 and we are at the Fort Lauderdale Seventh Day Adventist Church.” The 86-year old subscriber was battling shortness of breath.  The person onsite provided the address which GPS confirmed. The operator quickly requested dispatch and notified the customer’s son. No calls to 9-1-1 were placed. Had the subscriber been alone, a dispatch request would still have been made.

Figure 1 – Subscriber’s location at Fort Lauderdale Seventh Day Adventist Church (pin drop #10)

Figure 2 – Subscriber’s location (pin drop #10) in proximity to their home (green Home Icon), 0.78 miles away

Shortness of breath — known medically as dyspnea — is often described as an intense tightening in the chest, air hunger, difficulty breathing, breathlessness or a feeling of suffocation. Source: Mayo Clinic


MOBILE HEROES IN ACTION

This update is based on requests for help received on Sunday, April 12, 2020. Falls typically represent about 50% of verbally-verified emergencies. In this case, falls represented 61%. As you can see, we were told that some customers had fallen and said they were injured, and some had fallen out of bed – the latter of which is not uncommon nor is slipping out of a chair. Other, more common medical emergencies are labeled. There were many other alarms involving varying symptoms and, in some instances, we heard calls for help but the nature of emergency was unknown. The fire department was also notified of a tree that fell on a house and another customer reported that lightning struck his porch. Periodically, someone other than the subscriber requested help.

 

The chart and legend below is merely a reminder that MH is saving lives every day!

 

MobileHelp verified actual emergencies

 

Every second of every day, an older adult (age 65+) suffers a fall in the U.S.—making falls the leading cause of injury and injury death in this age group. ... Thirty million older adults fall each year—resulting in about 30,000 deaths. Each year, 3 million older adults are treated for a fall injury.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/injury/features/older-adult-falls/index.html


STROKE SIGNIFICANCE

On 1/28 at 7:58 PM, a subscriber advised that he was having a stroke or TIA. The operator quickly requested dispatch and notified the customer’s daughter.

 

TIA (transient ischemic attack, also sometimes called a “mini-stroke”) begins just like an ischemic stroke; the difference is that in a TIA, the blockage is temporary and blood flow returns on its own. Since blood flow is interrupted only for a short time, the symptoms of a TIA don't last long – usually less than hour.

Source: https://oregon.providence.org/forms-and-information/a/ask-an-expert-stroke-vs-tia/

 

A Transient Ischemic Attack [TIA] is often called a mini-stroke, but it's really a major warning. TIA is a temporary blockage of blood flow to the brain. Since it doesn't cause permanent damage, it's often ignored. ... TIAs may signal a full-blown stroke ahead.

Source: https://www.stroke.org/en/about-stroke/types-of-stroke/tia-transient-ischemic-attack/what-is-a-tia

 

Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every 4 minutes, someone dies of stroke.

 

Here is a sample of potential stroke emergencies reported by our valued customers or caregivers in January 2020:

 

  • FEELS LIKE IS A STROKE.
  • MAY BE A STROKE.
  • POSSIBLE STROKE.
  • UNABLE TO GET UP AND NOT TALKING LIKE HIMSELF. MAY HAVE HAD A STROKE.
  • BLURRED VISION AND BELIEVED WAS A STROKE.
  • MAY HAVE BEEN A STROKE AND COULD NOT GET HIM UP FROM BATHROOM.
  • WIFE WAS EXPERIENCING A STROKE.
  • DIZZY AND MAY HAVE HAD A STROKE.
  • HAD A STROKE AND IS VERY UNWELL.
  • NUMBNESS ON HAND, ARM AND SIDE OF FACE WITH SLURRY SPEECH.
  • MIGHT BE A STROKE.
  • MAY HAVE HAD ANOTHER STROKE.
  • MAY BE A STROKE.
  • MIGHT HAVE BEEN A STROKE.
  • CONFIRMED A SUSPECTED STROKE.
  • LOOKS LIKE A STROKE.
  • HAD FALLEN AND MAY HAVE HAD A STROKE.
  • THINKS HAD A STROKE.
  • THOUGHT WAS A HEART ATTACK OR STROKE.
  • LEGS DO NOT WORK- POSSIBLE STROKE.
  • MOTHER WAS HAVING A STROKE AND BELIEVES IS CLOSE TO PASSING.
  • MIGHT BE A STROKE.
  • HAD A STROKE.
  • CONFUSED, UNABLE TO WALK AND MAY HAVE HAD A STROKE.
  • BELIEVES HER MOTHER HAD A STROKE.
  • FELL, HIT HEAD, TROUBLE BREATHING, AND HAD PREVIOUSLY HAD A STROKE.

 

Falls are common after strokes, with stroke survivors having an estimated 14% risk of falling in the first month. Besides injuries, those who fall experience activity limitation, increased dependence, and fear of falling.

Source: https://bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12877-019-1377-7

 

 


RELOCATION

On 4/27 at 7:59 PM, we received a signal from a Solo customer’s Mobile Device. The customer was 4.68 miles from the address on file which GPS confirmed with 0.1 minute accuracy. As communication was not established, the operator sent multiple location requests (aka PING) to confirm the location. The operator quickly requested dispatch and notified the customer’s only personal contact.

 

Nine minutes later, another signal was received from the same device. This time, the customer was heard saying, “I need help!” The operator updated the 9-1-1 center and a dispatcher advised that EMS had arrived at the location. This time, the personal contact advised that the customer had moved and provided the new address which GPS had already confirmed.

 

While the mapping system provided a dispatchable address, the first dispatcher declined GPS coordinates as the address was immediately recognized as a retirement community. Despite the availability of location information, it’s always optimal to have a customer’s current address on file.

Figure 1 – Subscriber’s location in front of retirement home.

Figure 2 – Subscriber’s location (pin drop #10) in proximity to their previous home marked by red Home Icon.